WV Housing Conference
September 20-22, 2017
Embassy Suites Hotel
300 Court Street | Charleston, WV 25301
www.EmbassySuitesCharlestonWV.com

Wednesday, September 20 Thursday, September 21 Friday, September 22
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Registration (Coat Room)
7:30 am - 8:15 am
Continental Breakfast & Registration (Exhibit Area)
7:30 am - 8:15 am
Continental Breakfast & Registration (Exhibit Area)

12:00 pm – 1:15 pm
Welcome, Opening Luncheon and Keynote Presentation

(Salons D, E)

Welcome

Mary Skeens, Executive Director, CommunityWorks in West Virginia

Keynote: Aligning Housing and Economic Development

Secretary H. Wood Thrasher, West Virginia Department of Commerce
Introduced by Dave Clark, Executive Director, Woodlands Development Group

8:30 am - 9:30 am
Concurrent Sessions D
8:30 am - 9:30 am
Concurrent Sessions I
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Concurrent Sessions A
9:30 am - 9:45 am
Break (Exhibit Area)
9:30 am - 9:45 am
Break (Exhibit Area)
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Break (Exhibit Area)
9:45 am - 10:45 am
Concurrent Sessions E
9:45 am - 10:45 am
Concurrent Sessions J
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
Concurrent Sessions B
10:45 am - 11:00 am
Break (Exhibit Area)
10:45 am - 11:00 am
Break (Exhibit Area)
3:45 pm - 4:00 pm
Break (Exhibit Area)
11:00 am - 11:50 am
Concurrent Sessions F
11:00 am - 11:50 am
Concurrent Sessions K
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Concurrent Sessions C
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Luncheon & Keynote Presentation (Salons D, E)

The Future of Housing in West Virginia

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.)
Introduced by Nancy Tyler, J.D. M.S.W., Healthcare Consultant, WV Partnership for Elder Living, Inc.

12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Closing Luncheon and Awards Presentation

West Virginia Affordable Housing Hall of Fame Award
Introduced by Kitty Dooley, Commissioner of the Board of Directors, Charleston-Kanawha Housing

West Virginia Housing Innovation Awards
Introduced by Mary Skeens, Executive Director, CommunityWorks in West Virginia

5:00 pm
Adjourn / Dinner on your own
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Concurrent Sessions G
  2:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Break (Exhibit Area)
2:45 pm - 3:45 pm
Concurrent Sessions H
3:45 pm - 5:00 pm
Exhibitor/Networking Reception (Prizes will be awarded!)
5:00 pm
Adjourn and Dinner on your own

Concurrent Sessions A
Wednesday, September 20, 2017
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

This session will review the various programs and initiatives currently offered by the WVHDF; how to apply and where to find additional information on each program; and detail a few key programs including the funding sources and why certain requirements pertain to funding sources.
Across America we see more and more innovation in elder housing. From Housing Plus (services) to co-housing and more. There is another movement which goes right along with making living better for seniors and that's putting housing in an age-friendly community. In this session we will explore what makes a community age-friendly. We'll look at culture, livability, the way that businesses can be age-friendly and more.
American Property Consultants will conduct one 1 ½-day seminar on the HUD REAC Physical Assessment Subsystem (PASS) Uniform Physical Condition Standards (UPCS) review, updates and changes. Attendees will need to attend all eight (8) concurrent sessions and sign in each time to receive a certificate of participation. Topics include:
  • Introduction and Overview
    • What is REAC?
    • Physical Assessment (PASS)
    • The REAC Score
    • Physical Inspection Process
  • UPCS Inspection Protocol
    • Before, During, After the Inspection
    • Top 25 Common Cited Deficiencies
    • Quick & Better Fixes
  • Major Inspection Areas
    • Site
    • Building Exterior
    • Building Systems
    • Common Areas
    • Dwelling Units
    • Health and Safety
When we’re talking downtown revitalization, we’re almost always focused on storefronts and business recruitment opportunities. And, while that’s really important, it’s only half of the story! Most of the buildings in question are historic, or at least old enough to have been designed with upstairs living potential, so it’s time to start looking UP when we’re talking about redevelopment. The residential component of downtown is a critical factor in many ways. It contributes to the property value in and around a downtown, it contributes significantly to the local customer base for local merchants, and it helps shape and define the character of downtown. In this session, we’ll talk success stories across our state, a few successes from other states, and talk to each other about how to recognize the need and opportunity within your community.
This session will identify emerging drug trends in West Virginia and will also examine the dangers associated with specific drugs and manufacturing. This session will also identify future trends, enabling housing employees to be safe as possible while completing their tasks.

Concurrent Sessions B
Wednesday, September 20, 2017
2:45 pm – 3:45 pm

The first half of the session will discuss the benefits and advantages of attracting 2nd home owners to West Virginia, what other states have discovered about 2nd home owners regarding their reasons for coming to the state, the most significant aspects that drew them to the area, how they found their 2nd home, what they do with their 2nd home, how involved they become in the community surrounding their 2nd home, and the various uses they make of their 2nd homes.

The second half of the session will describe the process of becoming a Retire West Virginia Community and its value to your community.
Tucker County has been part of an economic transition in recent decades and faces unique challenges on how to best meet the needs of the local residents and the expectations of its visitors. A recent study was implemented to determine what the needs of residents are and how those needs fold into the economic development strategies of Tucker County. While affordable work-force housing has been an anecdotal discussion for years, this study quantifies and qualifies those discussions, identifying the demand and the need to mediate workforce housing disparity in the county. Additionally, the study examined small business needs by looking at the driving factors to their challenges and successes. The assessment combined a research-based characterization with a participatory process, allowing stakeholders to gain an understanding of present housing and small business demand and project future growth in the region, while ensuring project outputs were locally relevant and informative.

This session will present the model and methods the project team used to gather key local data and make it useful to the community, visitors, and potential entrepreneurs, with hopes that the model can be replicated around the state to provide a better understanding of our housing needs.
During this session, we will discuss who would benefit from a state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and how the EITC can support asset building efforts for working families and close the deal on a responsible state budget (also good for housing).
During this session, we will review the report developed from the Aligning Summit held August 17, 2017 at the Embassy Suites in Charleston. The purpose of the Aligning Summit was to improve collaboration among housing, economic development, tourism, and agriculture, and launch a collaborative plan of action to align job creation and housing solutions across the state. The session will cover the background of the initiative, showcase the current landscape, highlight key challenges, identify innovative and unique housing models, and outline policy and planning steps developed at the Aligning Summit to support ongoing collaboration and model implementation.

Concurrent Sessions C
Wednesday, September 20, 2017
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

This presentation will discuss the latest efforts to integrate senior housing and services. Findings in the latest research will be provided to support the value of such integration. Ways to make these opportunities will be discussed to take back to your own communities.
In 2017, the West Virginia Code was amended to address how local communities may regulate the repair, closing, and demolition of dwellings. Attorneys involved in drafting the legislation will describe changes to Chapter 8-12-16 of the West Virginia Code, impacting how local governments enforce the building code to better address dilapidated buildings. Attorneys will also be available to answer questions about the new law and its application to communities who have and have not adopted the International Building Code.
2017 has brought big changes to Washington D.C. that will impact every industry. Building relationships with elected officials can assure your voice is heard and have other benefits as well. Join us to learn the "how's" and "why's" of building effective relationships with members of Congress.
Participants from the Aligning Summit will have the opportunity to recovnene for a regional rapid planning session to carryout short-term action steps.

Concurrent Sessions D
Thursday, September 21, 2017
8:30 am – 9:30 am

This informative session will highlight HOME and Housing Trust Fund regulations and a review of requirements when submitting a proposal.
When a property owner fails to pay property tax, the county will sell a tax lien at public auction subject to several procedural and notice requirements. This process impacts the availability of housing and the rights of property owners. Property law attorneys from the WVU College of Law will describe the property tax lien sale process including the redemption period, ownership during the redemption period and what happens when the property is “sold to state”. Discussion questions, based on audience interest, may include opportunity for preferential bidding at tax sales by housing agencies (currently only allowed by land banks) and assistance locating a property owner when a tax sale has occurred.
Many organizations fail to tell a coherent and consistent story in their grant applications because they don’t have the tools to plan a proposal that tells the funder what they want to know. The Grant Writing for Nonprofit Organizations workshop will teach you how to use a Program Planning Framework to plan your programs so that grant applications tell a strong story. During the workshop, each section of a typical grant application will be highlighted with information on what funders are looking for and tips on how to write that section. All workshop participants will receive a free copy of the newly released manual, Mapping the Course: A Practical Approach to Grant Writing by Alice Ruhnke.
Traditional definitions of wealth are inadequate when trying to measure how community organizations create community wealth. Thinking of the wealth of a community as the net value of the well-being of its residents is a more meaningful way to assess the impact of a local housing organization. Reducing homelessness and improving housing stabilization creates healthier communities. How does this apply to you, your work and your organization?

Concurrent Sessions E
Thursday, September 21, 2017
9:45 am – 10:45 am

After a request is submitted to the State Historic and Preservation Office (SHPO), what happens next? This informative session will provide insight to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and the behind the scenes work concerning architectural and archaeological reviews.
This workshop will provide participants with detailed information regarding long term services and supports available to many seniors living across West Virginia. Participants will learn about the structure of aging programs through the Bureau of Senior Services and the Aging Network. This workshop will give an overview of the many programs available, including eligibility criteria, and methods for accessing these services. Topics covered will include In-Home Care (Waivers, Lighthouse, FAIR, Personal Care), Medicare Counseling, Legal Services and Older Americans Act Programs such as meals and transportation. Participants will also learn about various programs and resources to assist seniors with other needs such as housing, minor home repairs, home modifications, adaptive equipment, hearing aids, end of life care or nursing home transition and/or diversion.
Join this informative, interactive session to discuss how community developers and community builders across the country have added new tools to create pride of place and ways to engage meaningfully with the communities they serve. Based on two thought leaders’ experiences-- one from a state arts agency working in a rural ‘Promise Zone,’ the other from a national community development intermediary working in 44 states-- we’ll look at how this approach creates new ground and opportunity to build relationships, leadership, engagement and energy.
Many organizations fail to tell a coherent and consistent story in their grant applications because they don’t have the tools to plan a proposal that tells the funder what they want to know. The Grant Writing for Nonprofit Organizations workshop will teach you how to use a Program Planning Framework to plan your programs so that grant applications tell a strong story. During the workshop, each section of a typical grant application will be highlighted with information on what funders are looking for and tips on how to write that section. All workshop participants will receive a free copy of the newly released manual, Mapping the Course: A Practical Approach to Grant Writing by Alice Ruhnke.
Culture can be defined as the sum of attitudes, customs, and beliefs that distinguishes one group of people from another. Culture is transmitted through language, material objects, ritual, institutions and art from one generation to the next. Come explore the culture of Appalachia and why it matters to you and the people you serve.

Concurrent Sessions F
Thursday, September 21, 2017
11:00 am – 11:50 am

Long term recovery after natural disasters can be a challenging process, especially once the initial media attention and widespread support fades. Communication and collaboration with local partners is one of the primary keys to success. Hear from Appalachia Service Project as they share about their experiences responding to three unique disasters: Dry Creek Flood, TN (2012), West Virginia Thousand-Year Flood (June 2016), and the Chimney Tops 2 fire in Gatlinburg, TN (November 2016). Important steps in this process include working with Long Term Recovery groups, finding alternative funding sources, engaging donors and volunteers, casework, and careful communication with all involved in the process.
This session will focus on the Take Me Home, West Virginia program including upcoming changes and sustainability initiatives to create housing systems change - a statewide housing registry and training materials for discharge planners, potential tenants and housing providers.
This session will focus on the ways in which traditional bank lenders and non-profit lenders can work together to make deals happen. Speakers Jennifer Poling from Woodlands Community Lenders and Hoy Ferguson from Davis Trust Company will share examples of financing packages that have resulted in business purchases, new businesses, and building renovations in North Central WV. Through collaborations with banks, CDFIs, Federal Home Loan Bank, SBA and other sources of capital significant economic development can happen!
Learn how West Virginia organizations are meeting a variety of housing and community goals with FHLBank Pittsburgh Affordable Housing Program (AHP) funding. Presenters will provide a description of the project, application process, financial feasibility, challenges, resources, and provide a status update. FHLBank Community Investment Department staff will discuss current scoring priorities within a competitive process as well as feasibility standards required for the AHP. Panelists will engage in a conversation about finding capacity and lessons learned.

Projects to be highlighted include:
  • Greenville Senior Living and Community Center Project: 4 rental units
  • My Choice, My Home 2017: 32 owner-occupied rehabilitation units for seniors and people
  • with disabilities
  • Recovery Point West Virginia: 200+ rental units for people in recovery from substance abuse
Culture can be defined as the sum of attitudes, customs, and beliefs that distinguishes one group of people from another. Culture is transmitted through language, material objects, ritual, institutions and art from one generation to the next. Come explore the culture of Appalachia and why it matters to you and the people you serve.

Concurrent Sessions G
Thursday, September 21, 2017
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

This session will provide an overview of the Fund’s Homeownership, Movin’ Up and Secondary Market Programs as well as our Down Payment/Closing Cost Assistance and On-Site Septic Loan Programs.
This session will explore the importance of housing and supportive services working together to improve the lives of seniors. Better health for our aging population means living longer, happier lives at home. This session will specifically look at the challenges and successes of the Healthy Home Program in Elkins, WV.
New Market and Historic Tax Credits can be key financing sources for development projects, but the programs continue to elude many developers in West Virginia. How can WV communities benefit more from these tax credit programs, and what needs to be put in place to make these programs work? Join lenders and tax credit investors for a discussion about credits, the skill sets that need to be at the table, and the resources available to help. Learn about how lenders come into the projects, how financing can be structured, and what role local and state governments can play.
Learn what the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) is; how it impacts financial institutions; and what it means for nonprofit and for profit developers of affordable housing. Examples of CRA partnerships and projects will be shared. Session attendees will have the opportunity for open dialogue through Q&A and group discussion.
After one year of hard work and collaboration with many individuals and organizations, there is notable recovery progress in many affected counties; however, the work is not finished. Partners involved in the varying stages of long term recovery across the state will discuss the successes, challenges, and future of the recovery process. A well-represented panel will share stories of successful partnerships, communities working tirelessly to rebuild, and plans for the future.

Concurrent Sessions H
Thursday, September 21, 2017
2:45 pm – 3:45 pm

Monroe County Council on Aging is expanding senior services (meals/social services/senior centers) to include construction of housing for seniors at the "Greenville Senior Living and Community Center" project site, Greenville WV. Attendees will learn how a remote, rural community led a local, grass-roots effort to help seniors.
Community land trusts are organizations dedicated to long-term or permanent neighborhood assets such as affordable housing, basic goods and service businesses, historic buildings, and urban open space. While there are community development organizations in West Virginia that share some of the values and strategies used by community land trusts in other parts of the United States, this model hasn’t yet been used here. This session will explore whether the community land trust model could be effective and advantageous in meeting West Virginia’s community development challenges. Presenters will describe the community land trust model, contrast it with traditional community development organizations and strategies in West Virginia, explore potential barriers to implementation, and make recommendations for action.
This session will provide an overview of the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) program, how the program works, how to qualify your project or business for NMTC financing, what are the economic benefits to the recipients, who are the key players in NMTCs, what do Community Development Entities (CDEs) look for from potential projects, and how to get started!

Concurrent Sessions I
Friday, September 22, 2017
8:30 am – 9:30 am

This session will review current compliance requirements under the HOME rental program including but not limited to monitoring procedures, utility allowances, proper paperwork and income calculations.
The 2016 reinstatement of PBCA conducted MORs for most Project-Based Section 8 contracts has many managers anxious about their leasing and occupancy compliance. In this advanced class, we will highlight specific new elements of your leasing and occupancy procedures that will be scrutinized during your MOR (to include TSP edits, form updates, EIV compliance, and VAWA obligations) and help you develop your “To Do” list to avoid findings. Leave with a renewed sense of confidence that you can earn the rating you seek!
Downtowns were once the commercial and social hub for most communities in the United States. However, as economic patterns changed, America’s downtowns have changed with them. Downtown business owners face increased competition from large commercial outlets, and downtown residential space has to compete with suburban sprawl. As a result, many downtowns are struggling with increased vacancy and blight. But this new economic reality has also increased awareness for the importance of our communities’ downtowns. In this session, Dustin Smith will discuss how, and why, Woodlands Development Group is addressing downtown revitalization throughout Barbour, Randolph, and Tucker Counties. This session will also address the importance of engaging partner organizations, and how housing developers, local economic development entities, small business owners, and financial lending institutions can all work together to improve our cities’ downtowns.
This session will address the challenges, highlights and lessons learned from West Virginia housing professionals from different perspectives.

Concurrent Sessions J
Friday, September 22, 2017
9:45 am – 10:45 am

This session will focus on common Fair Housing issues that arise in the management of multifamily rental housing including reasonable accommodations and modifications, assistant animals, sexual harassment and more. A description of the WV Human Rights Commissions role and an overview of the state’s efforts in Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing including the Analysis of Impediments and Assessment of Fair Housing. The session will be concluded with a Q and A panel.
This session will provide a brief overview of the National Register of Historic Places and the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. The Standards for Rehabilitation offer guidance for the decision making in rehabilitation projects, as it relates to materials and treatment options. The National Register provides recognition of important historic structures and sites and opens the potential for funding through the State Historic Preservation Office. Information on the Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit program and Development Grant program will also be provided.
In 2015, CWWV developed the Nonprofit Capacity Building Initiative (NCBI) so that nonprofit member organizations will have the skills and expertise to successfully develop housing opportunities and support community development efforts throughout West Virginia. The goal of the NCBI is to build the capacity of State housing organizations for full utilization of all funding sources available in West Virginia.
An overview of the state budget and the implications of proposed federal budget changes.

Concurrent Sessions K
Friday, September 22, 2017
11:00 am – 11:50 am

This session will focus on common Fair Housing issues that arise in the management of multifamily rental housing including reasonable accommodations and modifications, assistant animals, sexual harassment and more. A description of the WV Human Rights Commissions role and an overview of the state’s efforts in Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing including the Analysis of Impediments and Assessment of Fair Housing. The session will be concluded with a Q and A panel.
The Green House Project, founded by Dr. Bill Thomas, is founded on three core values: Meaningful Life, Empowered Staff and Real Home. This session explores the process the Virginia Mennonite Retirement Community, a CCRC, followed to select the Green House model. Integration of the core values into the community's mission, and challenges to their full implementation and sustainability require vigilance and leadership, and the capacity to radically rethink traditional models of care delivery.
As urban residents ‘discover’ the space, beauty and lifestyle of rural communities, many multi-generation and lower income residents feel priced out of their hometowns. This presentation will explore and discuss the trends and the impacts of this rural migration. Second homeowners, remote workers and ‘hicksters’ can provide an influx of capital, creativity and commerce. They can also create tension and make long time community members feel disengaged, thus undoing much of the initial attraction. We will look at the causes and some of the solutions from Appalachia, to western ski towns to rural England. Can zoning, workforce housing and mixed use buildings be the answer?